Artworks

 

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boys will be boys

The intersection between play, violence and societal bond are investigated throughout this series of photographs. Questioning the manifestation of power dynamics and the action of aggression through inanimate objects removes the element of personal harm. The ersatz human forms become a stand in for the absurdity of violence in our culture, allowing for a dialog between what we have grown to accept and what is fundamentally unacceptable.


installation view of Soft Blows

installation view of Soft Blows

soft blows

This body of work is linked to a concept known as ‘subversive cross-stitch’, which involves more risqué designs, often fusing traditional cross-stitch design with a vernacular that shocks and is incongruous with the old-fashioned, more aesthetic use of cross-stitch.  The juxtaposition of beautiful patterns with grossly pejorative language explores a complex and dynamic wave of seduction and repulsion; the gravitational orbit around each piece varies among viewers forced to explore their own feelings of attraction, comfort, disgust, and guilt.  


Installation view of The Lost Ring Project

Installation view of The Lost Ring Project

The lost ring project

The Lost Ring Project was an interactive work created as a performance piece. The entire performance was based on happenstance - the chance a person would find one of my handcrafted rings, improperly stamped 14 karat gold. When polished the ring imitated gold, almost flawlessly. These rings were strategically scattered in high profile areas in various cities, with the hopes of their return. Individuals needed to find not only the ring, but also find one of my posters/ads asking for its return, then initiate contact with me, a complete stranger. The work was an attempt to extend contact between me and the world, moving my art into the community, thus pushing the limits of the art audience. This radical departure enabled me to move my practice away from traditional museums and galleries, bringing both client and venue into a critical mass - the general public.

Cities included: Portland, ME - New York City, NY - Halifax, NS - Quebec City - QC, Montreal, QC- Toronto, ON
& Ottawa ON


Installation view of (re)membering

Installation view of (re)membering

(re)membering

Remembering, an on-going project, exploring boundaries of what can be considered jewelry. In this work I find individuals with permanent scars on their bodies, usually scars with an unfavorable memory. I transform these scars into objects of contemplation/beauty by gold-leafing their subtleties. The result is a visual transformation into a form of wearable art/jewelry. The photographic images are a way of memorializing the transformative event. I have completed 15 of these transformations to date. A solo exhibition was mounted and included large-scale prints of the transformations (7 feet by 3 feet) and a symphony of voices (audio recordings of the participants) remembering the day the event occurred - which plays ambiently in the installation environment.


from Drawing from the Mundane

from Drawing from the Mundane

Drawing from the Mundane

In the summer of 2009 I began drawing paper bags (considered by most to be a mundane object) on large sheets of brown paper using chalk and charcoal. In the beginning of 2010 I framed a collection of these drawings and placed them in neighborhood trash heaps within the NYC area.  A ‘certified’ letter of authenticity was attached to the back of the framed work with instructions to contact the artist to verify the artworks origins.  The certified letter led the finder of the artwork to initiate contact with me, the maker. My intent was to formally meet the finder, sign their letter of authenticity and have them sign a contract enabling me to borrow this work for exhibition purposes. The finder was free to keep the framed work.


Installation view of Infinite Archive: Morris Jumel Mansion

Installation view of Infinite Archive: Morris Jumel Mansion

Infinite Archive: MJM

Responding to the unique history, archives and architecture of Morris-Jumel Mansion three artists (Patrick Perry, Sarah Rowe and Rachel Sydlowski) reinterpreted archival objects into a site-specific installation. Ceramic objects, jewelry and artists’ books presented a visual interpretation based on different areas of research by each artist. This shifting focus addressed how histories drift over time and how certain historical narratives become prominent while others recede into obscurity.  

A series of heavily etched wearable objects constructed of sterling silver created by Patrick Perry are a direct response to the handwritten letters between Eliza and her husband Stephen Jumel. The archival letters reveal an accretion of private exchanges, ranging from the quotidian to the intimate. Perry has chosen to pay homage to these intimate written exchanges by etching fragments of the letters directly onto silver. The material shift from pen and ink to metal raises questions about impermanence and indelibility and public and private lives.  


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Infinite Archive: Starlight Park

This interactive project invites Starlight Park visitors to re-enact the open air dances once hosted in the park. Using native plants to physically demarcate the perimeter of the dance floor and as conceptual framing, this installation utilizes stone to mimic the parquetry of a central medallion often found in grand ballrooms at the turn of the 20th century. Memory and history are intertwined through a fragmentary reconstruction, referencing what once was and what has been forgotten. Additionally, the use of native plants pays homage to indigenous societies and contemporary issues related to ecological concerns.


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The Fondest Wish

The Fondest Wish is part of a traveling group exhibition hosted by public libraries in New York City. This group show (30 artists in total) asked artists to responding to a book, poem, periodical or other archival material from the collection at the library.  Each  artist's work exists inside a drawer of a vintage card catalog cabinet.  Library patrons are encouraged to discover these works of art as they open the card catalog drawers themselves.  My work 'The Fondest Wish' was inspired by  Nathaniel Hawthorne's book, The Tale of King Midas & The Golden Touch.